July252014
“"assigned" is actually a term for intersex people, who were assigned a sex at birth by means of surgery. its a term that has been appropriated by the trans* community. it’s better to use the phrase "designated (female or male) at birth" to refer to trans* and nonbinary people!”

cubony (via beowulfstits-archive)

I should keep this in mind!

(via theaetherealmeadow)

Fairly certain this isn’t true. I know for a fact that CAMAB was coined by trans women, and I’m willing to guess cutting off the C doesn’t make it someone else’s word.

To quote freedominwickedness “CAMAB and CAFAB were originally created by trans women and then intersex people started identifying with them and started saying they created them so that they wouldn’t be associated with trans women. So yeah, there are those who consider it appropriative, but it’s because they’re transmisogynists. Anyone can use CAXAB language, because everyone is coercively assigned a gender at birth (i.e. no one chooses the gender they’re assigned), although for some it is more coercive than for others.”

(via dismember-cisgenders)

"defined" or "declared" was substituted to produce "DFAB" and "DMAB" and the objection then shifted to the "AB" part. At that point, the trans women involved who were in my circle of friends saw it as being an objection to trans women claiming they were assigned an incorrect gender at least at the earliest point in their lives and, possibly, at all.

(via agentdani)

Yeah, a few months ago we had this spate of people trying to take any words we used so all we’d be left with is “man” for camab trans people.

Like They wanted CAMAB, then AMAB, then DMAB. Someone did that last one like a day after I joked about it happening.

(via lisaquestions)

The thing that really gets me is how much people want to believe this. How badly they want to be “supporting” intersex (or any) people over trans people. Because nobody ever questions the idea that “assignment” refers exclusively to surgical alteration. I’ve seen people saying that the “assigned” in “assigned at birth” literally refers to surgery (how?), and therefore intersex people are the only people whose sex is assigned at birth.

(via blue-author)

(via projectqueer)

9PM

Why do you have to bring up race?

sinidentidades:

(via fuckyeahqueerpeopleofcolor)

8PM

Anonymous said: white people doing yoga hurts no one. so quit spewing your bullshit to others to make south asians feel "empowered" about stopping white people doing a practice from your motherland. as you stated, you've never actually seen or practiced yoga in south asia and as a result your uninformed opinions are hurting everyone in the process. you don't personally get a wound everytime someone who isn't south asian does yoga.

akashimikashi:

I never said that I get a wound when non-desis do yoga. There are other forms of cultural appropriation and colonization that can be far more harmful. The harm that I speak of has to do with representation of my culture. My family, friends, and I have been mocked and discriminated against because of our culture and religion - our symbols, clothing, diet, rituals, and language. But then I turn around and see white people doing the same things and being rewarded for it. So while I don’t get physical wounds, I resent the fact that everything my people do has to be filtered and diluted through white people before it becomes acceptable. I’m sorry if you don’t think that’s harmful.

I understand that the history of yoga in South Asia is complicated. There are several layers of colonialism & religious and caste discrimination that intersect with the history of yoga. Who does yoga even belong to? Brahmins, Hindus, all South Asians? What about South Asian Muslims? Well in the US, it seems to belong to skinny, upper/middle class, white women. While I am not able to speak extensively on yoga in South Asia, I understand that yoga in the US, similar to South Asia, has a complicated relationship with class/race/religion/etc.

I know that bhakti yoga is going to continue thrive as a billion dollar industry in the US, and there’s not much turning back (until Americans find a new fad). I know that my white neighbor doing her asanas isn’t threatening my physical safety. However, I know that yoga can’t be separated from a history of colonialism, and the inability for Americans to realize that is harmful.

7PM

thatcupofjo:

Friends— for the past year, I’ve been working on a project that has taught me so very much about what it means to be a filmmaker and collaborator. It’s the first project I’ve ever produced and the first I’ve ever written (and the first I’ve ever gif-ed yo). It’s far from perfect, and I still have so much to learn, but I think that I accomplished what I set out to do— that is, challenge the normative narrative by creating a place for marginalized identities in speculative fiction, a genre that has been systematically dominated by cis white men at varying degrees of scruffiness. I’d like to think we did something a little bit different.

This is THE PANTHEON PROJECT

A struggling grad student starts a vlog about her adventures moving to New York City, only to discover that her new roommates are actually the goddesses Pele and Guan Yin. With them come a not-so-ragtag band of all-powerful gods— gods who are far more human than we’d like them to be. (x)

(via wocrecovery)

6PM
“Power feminism is just another scam in which women get to play patriarchs and pretend that the power we seek and gain liberates us.”

bell hooks

Let’s talk about this quote for a second.

I remember I attended a college lecture about what feminism means in America and how imperial politics and economic gaps between the West and East render what women want and consider pivotal to their feminism as conflicting and even antagonistic to each other.

My feminism, first and foremost, will always be anti-imperialism.

Imperial politics are dangerous and the very essence of narcissism. Imperial politics demonstrated within a feminist frame usually goes as follows: the most privileged women, ie. those who have access to technology, representation, occupy a particular media-friendly image or ideology and have access to those in higher slots in society are allotted platforms to speak about their experiences as women and without question, this gets presumptuously labelled “women’s experiences”. Being that women who are globally bestowed the highest tier are usually allowed such room to speak, their minimal struggles are then homogenized as the quintessential female experience and misogyny is wholeheartedly announced a tangible issue that can be easily eradicated out of modern Western society.

Its no accident that women of color, women in occupied regions and those who face mass political or economic repression and their words which don’t satisfy neoliberal, imperialist gaze are deemed anti-progressive, race baiters, backwards, terrorist apologists, etc. Our complex, multi-faceted struggles within a white supremacist empire tap into too many accepted status quos for the average American moderate. It forces those who legitimize the war on terror and view racism as an entity of the past to confront their own unsightly prejudices and the systematic brutality their nations enacts on various global societies, as well as within its borders. Its easier to find (and fabricate) any reason to demonize the likes of Trayvon Martin and his family for his own tragic demise or deem young Yemeni children necessary collateral damage for “the greater good” than to examine what other oppressions beyond misogyny exist that unquestionably burden the lives of otherized communities, including and especially the women in said communities.

Power feminism expects women to unanimously rejoice in the presidential election of Hillary Clinton, while her administration carries out the same murderous policies as her predecessors. Power feminism labels any legitimate criticism of influential women as inherent egregious misogyny. Power feminism devalues the loss of women’s lives abroad, while infantizling their independent resistance and stripping their agency by shamelessly declaring intervention as saving them. Power feminism within an imperialistic frame needs the hyper-demonization of otherized communities to justify its occupation. Power feminism can be even more dangerous than ruthless misogyny because of its insidious nature and lack of culpability.

(via maarnayeri)

THIS POST IS GOLDEN (via wocinsolidarity)

(via wocrecovery)

5PM
4PM

milfynito:

"Why does representation matter it’s just a video game" - ppl with so much representation they could literally drown in it

(Source: smelterdemon, via thisisnotjapan)

3PM
fucknofetishization:

Truth to white people *cough EYK and mykoreanhusband and all those other white people like them* who think that just because a poc agrees with their bullshit they must think they’re right.

fucknofetishization:

Truth to white people *cough EYK and mykoreanhusband and all those other white people like them* who think that just because a poc agrees with their bullshit they must think they’re right.

(Source: whitepeoplestealingculture)

2PM
koreastandardtime:

I came across this cryptic poster today near Lincoln Center. The QR code leads you to this website, which explains that it’s part of a campaign created by New York-based visual artist Chang-Jin Lee to remember the victims of Japanese sexual slavery during World War II and to raise broader awareness of sexual violence during wartime. The campaign will culminate this Wednesday afternoon at Columbia University with the screening of a mini-documentary produced by Lee that includes interviews with “comfort women” survivors and a former Japanese soldier. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Columbia history professor Charles Armstrong.

koreastandardtime:

I came across this cryptic poster today near Lincoln Center. The QR code leads you to this website, which explains that it’s part of a campaign created by New York-based visual artist Chang-Jin Lee to remember the victims of Japanese sexual slavery during World War II and to raise broader awareness of sexual violence during wartime. The campaign will culminate this Wednesday afternoon at Columbia University with the screening of a mini-documentary produced by Lee that includes interviews with “comfort women” survivors and a former Japanese soldier. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Columbia history professor Charles Armstrong.

(via angrywocunited)

1PM
“Comfort Women have been the focal point of a festering controversy in intra-Asian relations for decades. Some of these women are still alive. Their fight to gain recognition has recently resulted in a memorial statue in Glendale that is currently being protested by the Japanese government and its apologists, both in Japan and Stateside. While American and colonized Asian history books are clear about the war crimes committed against Asian women during WWII, the Japanese have opted to completely omit this atrocity from their history books, exerting a concerted effort on all mainstream media platforms to suppress, deny, and erase the voices of these women.

Valleywag’s cynical, flippant clickbaiting only adds to this silencing; by reducing Comfort Women to a punchline, they erase the history and struggles of hundreds of thousands of women who have fought so long and hard to bring their painful realities to light and their abusers to justice. Valleywag’s joke, and Gawker’s refusal to apologize fully on behalf of its authors and editors and change their editorial policies, are salt in the wounds inflicted upon Comfort Women. Gawker and Valleywag are profiteers and collaborators; they convert suffering into gold in a cynical alchemy; they create revenue off the backs of the women whose physical and now digital bodies are continually abused and violated. They are a travesty.” Gawking At Rape Culture, by Kiriko Kikuchi, Mike Kim, Dorothy Kim | Model View Culture (via brutereason)

(via angrywocunited)

12PM

kusmajadi:

Raping women seems to be a normal byproduct of wars. During World War II, the Japanese military even set up a system for sex slavery: Tens of thousands of “comfort women” in Asia were forced into prostitution at military brothels. In addition, many girls were abused sexually in railroad wagons, factory warehouses or night after night at home. Most of these women have suffered physical and emotional consequences ever since. Photographer Jan Banning and writer Hilde Janssen visited Indonesian women who during the war were victims of forced sexual labor. In this exhibition, 18 of them break the persistent taboo against speaking out on the issue, thereby painting a gripping picture of this hidden history.

(via angrywocunited)

11AM
fuckyourracism:

"Given that housing isn’t as segregated as it was during the Klan’s heyday, several recruitment packages ended up in the driveways of minorities. In that aspect, the KKK doesn’t discriminate. "I mean, we can’t tell who lives in a house, whether they’re black, white, Mexican, gay, we can’t tell that," Robert Jones, a high ranking member, told WHNS. "And if you were to look at somebody’s house like that, that means you’d be pretty much a racist." (x)
I just can’t anymore.

in case you thought racism was over

fuckyourracism:

"Given that housing isn’t as segregated as it was during the Klan’s heyday, several recruitment packages ended up in the driveways of minorities. In that aspect, the KKK doesn’t discriminate. "I mean, we can’t tell who lives in a house, whether they’re black, white, Mexican, gay, we can’t tell that," Robert Jones, a high ranking member, told WHNS. "And if you were to look at somebody’s house like that, that means you’d be pretty much a racist." (x)

I just can’t anymore.

in case you thought racism was over

racism kkk 

10AM

dcwomenofcolor:

heliological:

dcwomenofcolor:

Racebent ladies on TV

Eartha Kitt as Selina Kyle (Batman, 1967)
Kristin Kreuk as Lana Lang (Smallville, 2001)
Candice Patton as Iris West (The Flash, 2014)
Zabryna Guevara as Sarah Essen (Gotham, 2014)

As of today:

Susan Heyward as Deena Pilgrim

Susan Heyward as Deena Pilgrim (Powers)

Oops, I thought my URL being there would’ve made it obvious, haha. I was focusing on DC ladies, and Deena is from Image/Marvel.

Nonetheless, this is good news! :)

July242014
knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Typography, Art and Posters You May Have Missed
Art posted during Gay Pride Weekend, Portland, Maine in late(r)-2000s
(Source: Down Is Not Up)

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Typography, Art and Posters You May Have Missed

Art posted during Gay Pride Weekend, Portland, Maine in late(r)-2000s

(Source: Down Is Not Up)

(via projectqueer)

10PM

[Harish] Raghavan has played/toured with Kurt Elling, Taylor Eigsti, Vijay Iyer, Ambrose Akinmusire, Eric Harland, Mark Turner, Aaron Parks, Greg Osby, Billy Childs, Benny Green, Geoffry Keezer, Terrell Stafford, Mike Moreno, Rodney Green, Logan Richardson, Fabian Almazan, Justin Brown, Dayna Stephens, Julian Lage, Gerald Clayton, Marcus Gilmore, Walter Smith III, among others.
Raghavan grew up in Northbrook, Illinois, just north of Chicago. At age eight he began studying Western and Indian percussion, and later switched to the double bass at seventeen. He studied bass with John Clayton at the University of Southern California and also with Robert Hurst. During his years in Los Angeles he recorded and played with many legendary West Coast musicians.
In 2009 he was a semi-finalist in the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Bass Competition.
Raghavan is a regular instructor at the Stanford Jazz Workshop and the Jazz at Centrum summer program in Port Townsend, Washington. He is featured on pianist Taylor Eigsti’s 2010 Concord release, Daylight at Midnight.

[Harish] Raghavan has played/toured with Kurt Elling, Taylor Eigsti, Vijay Iyer, Ambrose Akinmusire, Eric Harland, Mark Turner, Aaron Parks, Greg Osby, Billy Childs, Benny Green, Geoffry Keezer, Terrell Stafford, Mike Moreno, Rodney Green, Logan Richardson, Fabian Almazan, Justin Brown, Dayna Stephens, Julian Lage, Gerald Clayton, Marcus Gilmore, Walter Smith III, among others.

Raghavan grew up in Northbrook, Illinois, just north of Chicago. At age eight he began studying Western and Indian percussion, and later switched to the double bass at seventeen. He studied bass with John Clayton at the University of Southern California and also with Robert Hurst. During his years in Los Angeles he recorded and played with many legendary West Coast musicians.

In 2009 he was a semi-finalist in the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Bass Competition.

Raghavan is a regular instructor at the Stanford Jazz Workshop and the Jazz at Centrum summer program in Port Townsend, Washington. He is featured on pianist Taylor Eigsti’s 2010 Concord release, Daylight at Midnight.

(Source: asianamsmakingmusic, via mishthi)

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